Dental Filling (We are a Mercury FREE Clinic)

We only use state of the art highly researched filling materials which have ultra low shrinkage and high bond strength and will last you for a long time.

silver amalgam fillings
mercury filling
veneers

Mercury Filling

Tooth Colored composite fillings

Veneers

A dental restoration or dental filling is a dental restorative material used to restore the function, integrity and morphology of missing tooth structure. The structural loss typically results from caries or external trauma. It is also lost intentionally during tooth preparation to improve the aesthetics or the physical integrity of the intended restorative material. Dental restoration also refers to the replacement of missing tooth structure that is supported by dental implants.

Restoring a tooth to good form and function requires two steps, (1) preparing the tooth for placement of restorative material or materials, and (2) placement of restorative material or materials.

The process of preparation usually involves cutting the tooth with special dental burrs, to make space for the planned restorative materials, and to remove any dental decay or portions of the tooth that are structurally unsound. If permanent restoration can not be carried out immediately after tooth preparation, temporary restoration may be performed.

The prepared tooth, ready for placement of restorative materials, is generally called a tooth preparation. Materials used may be gold, amalgam, dental composites, resin-reinforced glass ionomers, porcelain or any number of other materials.

Tooth Preparation

Preparations may be intracoronal or extracoronal.

Intracoronal preparations are those preparations which serve to hold restorative material within the confines of the structure of the crown of a tooth. Examples include all classes of cavity preparations for composite or amalgam, as well as those for gold and porcelain inlays. Intracoronal preparations are also made as female recipients to receive the male components of Removable partial dentures.

Extracoronal preparations are those preparations which serve as a core or base upon which or around which restorative material will be placed to bring the tooth back into a functional or aesthetic structure. Examples include crowns and onlays, as well as veneers.

In preparing a tooth for a restoration, a number of considerations will come into play to determine the type and extent of the preparation. The most important factor to consider is decay. For the most part, the extent of the decay will define the extent of the preparation, and in turn, the subsequent method and appropriate materials for restoration.

Direct restorations

This technique involves placing a soft or malleable filling into the prepared tooth and building up the tooth before the material sets hard. The advantage of direct restorations is that they usually set quickly and can be placed by one operator. Since the material is required to set while in contact with the tooth, limited energy can be passed to the tooth from the setting process without damaging it. Where strength is required, especially as the fillings become larger, indirect restorations may be the best choice. It can be done in one visit with a dentist.

Indirect restorations

This technique of fabricating the restoration outside of the mouth using the dental impressions of the prepared tooth. Common indirect restorations include inlays and onlays, crowns, bridges, and veneers. Usually a dental technician fabricates the indirect restoration from records the dentist has provided of the prepared tooth. The finished restoration is usually bonded permanently with a dental cement. It is often done in two separate visits to dentist. Common indirect restorations are done using gold or ceramics.

While the indirect restoration is being prepared, a provisory/temporary restoration sometimes is used to cover the prepared part of the tooth, which can help maintain the surrounding dental tissues.

Removable dental prostheses (mainly dentures) are considered by some to be a form of indirect dental restoration, as they are made to replace missing teeth. There are numerous types of precision attachments (also known as combined restorations) to aid removable prosthetic attachment to teeth, including magnets, clips, hooks and implants which could be seen as a form of dental restoration.

Materials used in dental restorations

Metals and metallic alloys
These metals are mostly used for making crowns, bridges and dentures. Pure titanium could be successfully incorporated into bone. It is biocompatible and stable.

Precious metallic alloys
gold (high purity: 99.7%)
gold alloys (with high gold content)
gold-platina alloy
silver-palladium alloy
titanium
Base metallic alloys
cobalt-chromium alloy
nickel-chrome alloy
Amalgam
Silver amalgam
Amalgam is widely used for direct fillings, and done in single appointment. Cast gold is used for indirect restorations.

Direct Gold
Gold
Although rarely used, due to expense and specialized training requirements, gold foil can be used for direct dental restorations.

Tooth colored
Dental composites are also called white fillings, used in direct fillings. Crowns and in-lays can be made in the laboratory from dental composites. These materials are similar to those used in direct fillings and are tooth coloured. Their strength and durability is not as high as porcelain or metal restorations and they are more prone to wear and discolouration.

Porcelain (ceramics)
Full-porcelain (ceramic) dental materials include porcelain, ceramic or glasslike fillings and crowns (a.k.a jacket crown, as a metal-free option). They are used as in-lays, on-lays, crowns, and aesthetic veneers. A veneer is a very thin shell of porcelain that can replace or cover part of the enamel of the tooth. Full-porcelain (ceramic) restorations are particularly desirable because their color and translucency mimic natural tooth enamel.

Comparison

Composites and Amalgam are used mainly for direct restoration. Composites can be made of color matching the tooth, and surface can be polished after filling.

Amalgam fillings expand with age, possibly cracking the tooth and requiring repair and filling replacement. But chance of leakage of filling is less.

Composite fillings shrink with age and may pull away from the tooth allowing leakage. If leakage is not noticed early recurrent decay may occur.

Fillings have a finite lifespan: an average of 12.8 years for amalgam and 7.8 years for composite resins. Fillings fail because of changes in the filling, tooth or the bond between them. Secondary caries formation can also affect the structural integrity the original filling. Fillings are recommended for small to medium sized restorations.

Porcelain and Gold are used for indirect restorations like crowns and partial coverage crowns (onlays). Some types of porcelains are hard, but can cause wear on opposing teeth. They are brittle and are not always recommended for molar restorations. A new material called lithium disilicate (ips.emax) is indicated for use on molars for crowns and onlays now because it is fracture resistant compared to other porcelains used for dental restorations.

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